How to Use Zapps Pro
The Collection

Pro Editor: Doc Analysis

 
Pro Editor group on The Collection ribbon

Use Doc Analysis to find style issues within an open document. 

The Doc Analysis button opens a drop down menu that provides four related actions.

 
Doc Analysis button and drop down menu

This Zapps Pro function compares the current document’s actual paragraph and text formatting against the formatting specified by the Styles in use.

Where manual deviations known as Direct Formatting are found, Doc Analysis inserts editors comments and marks the specific issues for your attention. Learn more about Direct Formatting in the Helpful Information below.

When scanning very large documents, the time to complete the process can be lengthy. For that reason, prior to starting a scan you may want to select only a portion of the document. Otherwise the function will search the entire document. The scanning is further segmented by scanning for manual Text formatting separately from scanning for manual Paragraph formatting.


 
15.png

To Perform a Text Analysis

 

Click on Perform a Text Analysis. Your document will be scanned.

 

When the scan is complete you will see a message confirming successful completion of the Analysis and telling you how many Pro Editor Comments have been added.

 

Click OK.

 

You will see the Comments in the Review pane along the right side of your screen and the offending text will be highlighted.

 

The Comments will tell you what the style should be, based on the text styles in use in the document.


To Perform a Paragraph Analysis

Before a Paragraph Analysis can run, any Text Analysis comments in the document must either be resolved or removed.

 

Click on Perform a Paragraph Analysis. Your document will be scanned. 

 

When the scan is complete you will see a message confirming successful completion of the Analysis and telling you how many Pro Editor Comments have been added. 

 

Click OK.

 

You will see the Comments in the Review pane along the right side of your screen and the offending paragraphs will be highlighted.

 

The Comments will tell you what the style should be, based on the paragraph styles in use in the document.


 

To Remove Pro Editor Comments

Use the Doc Improve function to address the issues found.

Or, Click the Remove Pro Editor Comments option on the Doc Analysis drop down menu.


To Change Pro Editor Search Criteria

Change Search Criteria dialog box
  1. Click Change Pro Editor Search Criteria
  2. This will open a dialog box
  3. Select the criteria you require
  4. Click OK

Learn more about the Search Criteria options in the Helpful Information section below.

 


Please read this Helpful Information

 
 

about Styles

In Word, the “Style” function defines a collection of Font (a.k.a. Text) and Paragraph attributes.

  • For Fonts, some of these attributes are: font type, size, bolding, underlining, italicizing, color, language, and more.
  • For Paragraphs, these attributes include: alignment, outline level, indentation, spacing, and more.

The purpose of using document “Styles” is first and foremost productivity, because one setting can describe a multitude of text formatting properties that would otherwise have to be set on each string of text separately.

Another other purpose of Styles is to bring uniformity to the formatting of documents. For this reason, many organization have “Style Guides” for all of their written documents.


 

Direct Formatting

When portions of a document’s formatted content are altered manually and those alterations fall outside of the predefined “Style” specifications, this is called “Direct Formatting” and Direct Formatting (DF) is what this Zapps Pro function locates in a document.


 

Why does Direct Formatting matter?

Other than violating the Style Guide, what’s the big deal?

As document content is reused and merged with other document content the formatting can change unpredictably. Depending on various settings in the Microsoft Word software being used, direct formatting in either the source or destination document can cause this unpredictable behavior to occur.

To provide an example of the consequences of Direct Formatting, we can simply pose this question:

Have you ever seen a carefully bulleted and indented list that took you a long time to get “just right”, disappear or corrupt and you do not know why?

Unfortunately it was a result of Direct Formatting initiated by a copy and paste of other content that shared a Style Name, or an accidental/purposeful template update that reapplied a global style that you had manually formatted.


 

About Pro Editor Search Criteria

Some Direct Formatting can be rather harmless, as in the case of Bolding and Italicizing. That is why we have provided a “Preference” option for excluding certain formatting attributes from the document scanning Pro Editor performs.


Here is more information about several of the search criteria preference settings whose purpose might not be exactly clear.

 

Pattern Fills 

Pattern fills concern special Text Effects that can be applied from Word’s Modify Font dialog. If someone changes the specified “fill” pattern on certain text from a sold fill to a gradient fill… do you care? That is why we included “Pattern fills” as an optional exclusion.

 
 

Spelling and Grammar 

The Pro Editor scanning function is not looking for spelling and grammar errors in the document. However, certain objects such as Equations or Pictures copied from other sources will continue to carry the Language attribute of their source location.


 

For example, an Equation copied from a document written in Arabic might still carry that Arabic language attribute when it is pasted into an English formatted document.

If that is the case then Pro Editor will generate a “Spelling and Grammar” comment about the formatting of the Equation. We generally recommend that you exclude those type of editor comments.


 

Language 

We generally recommend that you not exclude any language from generating Pro Editor comments. By default, Pro Editor does not comment on any language attribute applied to text when it matches the language setting of your running version of Word – however, all other languages will generate editor comments. The reason for our recommendation of not excluding other language comments is for document proofing purposes. 

You may at some point experience the situation where you are absolutely certain that a particular word is spelled correctly but your Word software keeps insisting it is not. Most likely the specific text has a foreign language attribute applied to it and Word’s proofing tool is judging it based on French, Spanish or whatever other language is applied and does not match the language specified by the Style or your Word software.


What to do about the Doc Analysis issues found?

Use the Doc Improve function to address issues found by Doc Analysis.

 
 

 

Not finding the help you need?